1. General

Panic of Coronavirus disease from 2019

DNA OF CORONA
VIRUS CELLS

Overview of Diesease

Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that can cause illnesses such as the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In 2019, a new coronavirus diesease was identified as the cause of a disease outbreak that originated in China.

Public health groups, including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and WHO, are monitoring the pandemic and posting updates on their websites. These groups have also issued recommendations for preventing and treating the illness.

Symptoms Of coronavirus 

Signs and symptoms of COVID-19 may appear two to 14 days after exposure and can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Other symptoms can include:

  • Tiredness
  • Aches
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat

Some people have experienced the loss of smell or taste.

Cough due to infection
Effected by virus

The severity of COVID-19 symptoms can range from very mild to severe. Some people may have no symptoms at all. People who are older or who have existing chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, lung disease or diabetes, or who have compromised immune systems may be at higher risk of serious illness. This is similar to what is seen with other respiratory illnesses, such as influenza

Fever when virus become a serious stage
Fever from virus

Early symptoms of COVID-19 are much the same as those of the flu or a cold. Don’t panic. Call your doctor to check in, if you’re worried, but treating mild or moderate symptoms at home until you’re well will protect you and help stop the spread of whatever you have.

Causes by virus

Infection with the new coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

It’s unclear exactly how contagious the new coronavirus is. Data has shown that it spreads from person to person among those in close contact (within about 6 feet, or 2 meters). The virus spreads by respiratory droplets released when someone with the virus coughs, sneezes or talks.

It can also spread if a person touches a surface with the virus on it and then touches his or her mouth, nose or eyes.

Risk factors to take care

Risk factors for COVID-19 appear to include:

  • Recent travel from or residence in an area with ongoing community spread of COVID-19 as determined by CDC or WHO
  • Close contact with someone who has COVID-19 — such as when a family member or health care worker takes care of an infected person.

When to see a doctor

If you have COVID-19 symptoms or you’ve been in contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19, contact your doctor or clinic right away for medical advice. Tell your health care team about your symptoms and possible exposure before you go to your appointment.

If you have emergency COVID-19 signs and symptoms, such as trouble breathing, chest pain or pressure, confusion, or blue lips or face, seek care immediately.

If you have respiratory symptoms but you are not and have not been in an area with ongoing community spread, contact your doctor or clinic for guidance. Let your doctor know if you have other chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease or lung disease. As the pandemic progresses, it’s important to make sure health care is available for those in greatest need.

Preventions for Disease

Although there is no vaccine available to prevent infection with the new coronavirus, you can take steps to reduce your risk of infection. WHO and CDC recommend following these precautions for avoiding COVID-19:

  • Avoid large events and mass gatherings.
  • Avoid close contact (within about 6 feet, or 2 meters) with anyone who is sick or has symptoms.
  • Keep the distance between yourself and others if COVID-19 is spreading in your community, especially if you have a higher risk of serious illness.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with your elbow or a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw away the used tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Avoid sharing dishes, glasses, bedding and other household items if you’re sick.
  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces daily.
  • Stay home from work, school, and public areas if you’re sick unless you’re going to get medical care. Avoid taking public transportation if you’re sick.

The CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public places, such as the grocery store, where it’s difficult to avoid close contact with others. It’s especially suggested in areas with ongoing community spread. This updated advice is based on data showing that people with COVID-19 can transmit the virus before they realize they have it. Using masks in public may help reduce the spread from people who don’t have symptoms. Non-medical cloth masks are recommended for the public. Surgical masks and N-95 respirators are in short supply and should be reserved for health care providers.

If you have a chronic medical condition and may have a higher risk of serious illness, check with your doctor about other ways to protect yourself.

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